Carricak-A-Rede Rope Bridge

Carrick-a-Rede boasts an exhilarating rope bridge experience.

Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede island over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Today visitors are drawn here simply to take the rope bridge challenge! The rope bridge originally consisted of a single rope hand rail which has been replaced by a two hand railed bridge by the National Trust. Once you reach Carrick Island, the reward is seeing the diverse birdlife and an uninterrupted view across to Rathlin Island and Scotland.

The area is exceptional in is natural beauty, to the left as you come down the steep hill is Larrybane headland which once stretched out towards Sheep Island and had a promontory fort on the top dating to 800AD, underneath large caves once served as home to boat builders and a safe resting place from winter storms.

Giants Causeway

Northern Ireland's only UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Sea birds can be seen off the coast around the Causeway, with species such as fulmar, petrel, cormorant, shag, redshank guillemot and razorbill being frequently observed. Rare and unusual plant species including sea spleenwort, hare's foot trefoil, vernal squill, sea fescue and frog orchid can be found on the cliffs and nearby rock formations. Guided tours of the Causeway are available by arrangement for groups of more than 15 people, and there is access for visitors with disability. The area is suitable for picnics, cliff and country walks, and dogs are welcome on leads.

The New Giant's Causeway Visitor Centre - 'Commended' Best Visitor Experience, NITA Awards 2013. Rising and blending into the landscape, with walls of glass, basalt columns and a state of the art interior designed by award winning architects Heneghan-Peng, the Visitor Centre is truly innovative.